crossculturalcommunication

Friday, September 08, 2006

Mass hysteria in children after snake killed

Dozens of children have fainted, apparently because of mass hysteria, after school authorities in Nepal killed a snake, considered as sacred by many Hindus, witnesses said on Thursday.

At least 67 students, aged between nine and 16 years, have had fainting fits since Tuesday in the mainly Hindu country, they said. "Children suddenly scream, cry and faint," Rishikesh Baral, assistant headmaster of the school, told Reuters by phone.

Read more: Nepal

Cultural sensitivity in overseas hiring

Hiring the right people is a tough task, particularly when they are located thousands of miles away. As Indian companies go global, they focus on recruiting local talent for their overseas operations. The first challenge of possessing a global workforce are the cross-cultural issues that come up right at the hiring stage itself. Selectors need to be trained in and sensitised to the nuances of a candidate’s culture. These differences must be taken into account while recruiting an individual. Many a times good candidates are rejected only because of unaware hiring managers and lack of effective communication between the two.

Read more: Hiring

Islam and Breastfeeding: Religious and Cultural Traditions

Islamic religious beliefs and cultural practices in Muslim communities guide women's breastfeeding decisions and are important factors in early infant care and feeding, according to a paper in the recent issue (Volume 1, Number 3) of Breastfeeding Medicine, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. (www.liebertpub.com) and the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. The paper is available free online at www.liebertpub.com/bfm.

Read more: Islam

Diversity training fails to boost minorities into management

A new study shows that diversity training programs have roundly failed to eliminate bias and increase the number of minorities in management, despite the fact that many corporations have spent increasing amounts of money on them since the 1990s.

In a paper to be published in the American Sociological Review, Frank Dobbin, professor of sociology in Harvard University's Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Alexandra Kalev of the University of California, Berkeley, and Erin Kelly of the University of Minnesota concluded that such efforts to mitigate managerial bias ultimately fail in their aims. In contrast, programs that establish responsibility for diversity, such as equal opportunity staff positions or diversity task forces, have proven most effective.

Read more: Diversity

word of the day: small beer

small beer \small beer\, noun:
1. Weak beer.
2. Insignificant matters; something of little importance.
adjective:
1. Unimportant; trivial.

We dined early upon stale bread and old mutton with small beer. -- Ferdinand Mount,, Jem (and Sam)

I was not born for this kind of small beer, says Joan the wife of the colonial governor, who imagines leading armies or "droves of inflamed poets." -- Nancy Willard, "The Nameless Women of the World", New York Times, December 18, 1988

Posted by Kwintessential at 5:21 PM
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