crossculturalcommunication

Wednesday, June 01, 2005

doing business in chile

For the globe trotting business traveller, doing business abroad brings with it cross cultural communication challenges. Understanding and appreciating a country's business culture, protocol and etiquette is important in establishing good business relationships.

Our new guide to doing business in Chile offers some basic tips on the above mentioned areas such as business culture and etiquette. It is not intended to summarise all ‘doing business tips’ nor meant to stereotype. It simply highlights some key areas for consideration when doing business in Chile.

Read more: Doing Business in Chile

swedes have most successful cultural exports

Sweden has been voted number one in a poll of 11 nation brands for its image as both comforting and cutting edge.

The UK came second in the international survey about people's perception of nations' governance, business, exports, people, culture and tourism.

Read more: Sweden

msn enters chinese market

Microsoft launched MSN China, a Chinese-language web portal, to tap deeper into the world's second-largest internet market.

The portal will be run through Shanghai MSN, a joint venture Microsoft established with government-operated Chinese firm Shanghai Alliance.

Read more: MSN
Posted by Neil Payne at 10:47 AM
Categories: Web Globalization

intercultural differences sour export deals

Misunderstandings can easily occur between people from the same background, but the chances of confusion increase when the parties speak different languages and have different values and expectations.

The DHL Export Barometer released in November last year found different business and cultural practices were considered by more first time exporters to be a major barrier to exporting than any other single factor.

Read more: Export

stealth expatriates

As the definition of what it means to work overseas for your company changes, companies are facing a new problem: Stealth expatriates.

That's a moniker some are attributing to workers who head to foreign lands without ever tapping their company's traditional expatriate program, a set of policies designed to keep tabs on and assist workers who spend months or years toiling abroad for their firm.

Read more: Expats

maltese interpreters boothless

The interpreters' post-graduate diploma course at the University of Malta may not open this year because a tender for the supply of equipment has not been awarded yet.

The European Union had approved €150,000 for the interpreting course to be set up in Malta in June last year. A year later, however, the project was still "stuck in the local bureaucratic machine", Joseph Eynaud, course director of post-graduate diploma courses in translation and interpreting, told The Times yesterday.

Read more: Malta
Posted by Neil Payne at 10:29 AM
Categories: Translation News

beijing police prepare for olympics

Police in Beijing held an English-speaking contest yesterday to encourage their colleagues to learn the language in preparation for the 2008 Olympics.

The final round of the competition, organized by the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Public Security, involved 13 performances. The participants were the winners from among 51 performances in the first round. Each performance had to focus on police affairs or the daily life of police officers.

Read more: Beijing
Posted by Neil Payne at 10:26 AM
Categories: Language Learning News

univision's spanish site proving financial success

Univision Online, Inc., the interactive division of Univision Communications Inc., today announced that according to a study conducted by Nielsen Media Research, Univision.com is the most visited Spanish-language website among Spanish-dominant and bilingual Hispanic Internet users 16 years of age or older.

The 2005 study builds on similar work conducted by Nielsen Media Research every year since 2001. Univision.com has been named the most visited Spanish-language website for the last five years in a row. This year's Nielsen study found that Hispanic Internet users report visiting Univision.com nearly 2 times more often than Yahoo! en Espanol, nearly 3 times more often than Terra and nearly 13 times more often than MSN Latino.

The study also found that advertising on Univision.com positively impacts purchase behavior and that the combination of advertising on both Univision.com and the Univision Network has a powerful effect on branding and purchase intent. Households that watch the Univision Network and visit Univision.com are 58%(1) more aware of and 14%(2) more likely to purchase brands that have advertised on both properties in the past twelve months than Uni vision Network households that are not online.

Read more: Univision

word of the day: fetter

fetter \FET-uhr\, noun:
1. A chain or shackle for the feet; a bond; a shackle.
2. Anything that confines or restrains; a restraint.

transitive verb:
1. To put fetters upon; to shackle or confine.
2. To restrain from progress or action; to impose restraints on; to confine.

The right ankle of one, indeed, is connected with the left ankle of another by a small iron fetter. --William Wilberforce, On the Horrors of the Slave Trade

But just let even a thumb's pressure be put upon me to tame the wild something in me, and I feel it like a fetter. --Kahlil Gibran, quoted in Kahlil Gibran, Man and Poet, by Suheil Bushrui and Joe Jenkins

Posted by Neil Payne at 10:18 AM
Categories: Expand Your Vocabulary

Tuesday, May 31, 2005

scotland yard asks asian businesses to hire youths

Scotland Yard is to ask Asian businesses to hire vulnerable youngsters from their own communities in an attempt to divert them from crime.

Police say that although many Asian families in Britain encourage their children to work hard and be successful, and there are more than 300 millionaires of south Asian origin in the UK, some young Asians hit a glass ceiling at work, or find it difficult to get a job at all.

Read more: MET

beckham - typical expat when it comes to language

England soccer captain David Beckham has received flak from Real Madrid for not honing his Spanish skills despite residing in Spain for the last two years.

The team's footballing director said that Beckham had failed the club by not learning the language even after undergoing two years of Spanish learning lessons.

"He's been here nearly two years and he doesn't speak it well. It's to do with respect towards the club who pays him, the fans and also towards his colleagues. He can give a lot to the team with what he says, but knowing so little of the language, he can't," the Mirror quoted Arrigo Sacchi, an Italian as saying.

Read more: Beckham

google's machine translation systems

As the world wide web continues its shift towards a multilingual format, Google have shown foresight with the development of their Machine Translation System.

The new tool hopes to make the web accessible to anyone in any language by providing accurate translations across all major languages. So how is it done? Philipp Lenssen explains:
"It’s certainly complex to program such a system, but the underlying principle is easy – so easy in fact that the researchers working on this enabled the system to translate from Chinese to English without any researcher being able to speak Chinese. To the translation system, any language is treated the same, and there is no manually created rule-set of grammar, metaphors and such. Instead, the system is learning from existing human translations. Google relies on a large corpus of texts which are available in multiple languages."

Read more: Google

word of the day: recreant

recreant \REK-ree-uhnt\, adjective:
1. Cowardly; craven.
2. Unfaithful; disloyal.

noun:
1. A coward.
2. An unfaithful or disloyal person.

His recreant companion disappears around the fence, but he remains, smiling affably. --Eric J. Segal, "Norman Rockwell and the fashioning of American masculinity," Art Bulletin, December 1, 1996.

To any man there may come at times a consciousness that there blows, through all the articulations of his body, the wind of a spirit not wholly his; that his mind rebels; that another girds him and carries him whither he would not. . . . The open door was closed in his recreant face. --Genie Babb, "Where the bodies are buried," Narrative, October 1, 2002

Posted by Neil Payne at 9:50 AM
Categories: Expand Your Vocabulary

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