Branding and Translation

Branding and Translation

What are customers around the world saying about the new booming Middle Eastern brands? What are they reading in the brand names? Which ones are they loving and talking about? Which ones can they pronounce, type and remember easily? Are these new local brands leading the charge for global mindshare and creating a sense of greatness, or are they seriously lost in global translation?

Currently, 99 percent of mega-Middle Eastern projects are being branded under Arabic-based names — which are mostly foreign to international audiences — while some are projecting mixed messages due to translation. These stumbling blocks can seriously limit brand-name appreciation, prolonging the costly process of obtaining global mindshare.

To appreciate this dilemma, unless you are fluent in Japanese, try to make sense out of a fancy scripted Japanese name with some deeply rooted cultural message and a rich heritage.

For this reason, more than half a century ago, the global image-savvy corporate Japan developed all of its major brand names based on international rules of translations, taking into account unintended connotations and pronunciations. This was done with an eye toward global appeal, making the names easy to talk about, spell and remember. Contrary to popular belief, America really provided the most resistance to global branding E-Mail Marketing Software – Free Trial. Click Here.. It was the Japanese who truly laid the systematic foundation on what makes globally accepted and universal name identities fit enough to capture global attention.

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Katia Reed
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