Alternative Maps of the World

globe-world-map.jpg

Alternative Maps of the World

globe-world-map.jpgMaps are a wonderful way of looking at the world. The Washington Post has listed 40 maps that “explain the world”. Although they don’t necessarily do quite that, some of the maps are of interest from a cultural perspective. Here are some of the the more interesting maps.

The Most Welcoming Countries to Foreigners

Based on research carried out by the World Economic Forum, here are the countries of the world where you might receive a warm welcome or a frosty reception. Does it seem right based on your experience?

map of most welcoming countries to foreigners

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Writing Systems and Alphabets around the World

As a professional translation company, this map caught our eye as it’s a lovely illustration of how cultures form around language. Arabic centrally dominates the map showing its key role in international politics and business.The linguistic diversity of East Asia is reminds us of the vast diversity within the region.

map of writing systems of the world

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The Most Emotional Countries in the World

As part of cultural awareness training, one of the topics sometimes covered is cultural differences when it comes to showing emotion when doing business. Those with international experience will attest to the differences shown say between the Brazilian and the Japanese business person. When looking at this map though some of it looks out of kilt; US more emotional than Indians? It’s not straightforward so read the research behind it. What do you think would be the most and least emotional countries?

map of emotional countries
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The Most Ethnically Diverse Countries of the World

Green countries are more ethnically diverse; orange countries more homogenous. The map shows countries in Europe and Northeast Asia tend to be the more homogenous with sub-Saharan African nations the most diverse. Any trends you can spot?

map of ethnically diverse countries
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To see the other 36  maps, please visit The Washington Post.

Katia Reed
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