Mobile Phones and Cultural Differences

multilingual_language_translation.png

Mobile Phones and Cultural Differences

multilingual_language_translation.pngCurrently in the news > the French aren’t happy about English terminology, the release of a great new book on translation and a look at global mobile phone use and cultural differences!

French language

A great deal of English words that have to do with technology are incorporated into other languages. In most of these languages, these neologisms are accepted easily, but in the French speaking world, they are certainly not! French critics believe the imposition of English on French does not only affect the terminology of the language, but the language as a whole. This is why French equivalents must be found for English terms. These terms already exist, but are often only used regionally, which does not benefit smooth business between francophone countries. When international French terms will be coined, there are several ways to spread them across the globe, for example via FranceTerme. By using terms that actually mean something to the French public, the language will continue to expand itself and will not be taken over by English terminology. Read more

More languages at school please!
Multillingual education

Josep Gonzalez, Head of the British school of Barcelona, seizes International Language Day to stress the importance of multilingualism. Gonzalez believes it is important for a child to learn multiple languages, as this can further their careers and can benefit the travelling student. However, it is also important because it teaches the student about culture. Even though every school should find an approach to teaching multiple languages that fits their curriculum, Gonzalez states that multilingualism should be promoted to give school children a head start in life. Read more

Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms the World
Nataly Kelly

You might have missed it, but 30 September was International Translation Day! It might seem strange to dedicate an entire day to the act of translation, but it is a good way to create awareness about the amount of translation that we encounter on an everyday basis.  To celebrate this utterly important holiday, Nataly Kelly has come up with ten reasons why translation is more important than we think. Read more

Shakespearean Translation Tool
Shakespeare translation

At Swansea University, an online tool has been developed that is able to compare the 37 German translations of Act One, Scene Three of Shakespeare’s Othello. This tool is remarkable because it can calculate the “Eddy value” of a line, i.e. the degree of distinctness of a translation in comparison to other translations. In addition, the tool uses colours to indicate how many different translations there are of one single line and can display the various formats of the translations with the “alignment” tool. As the tool now only covers a very small part of one play, more funding is needed to enable the tool to encompass more scenes and more plays. Read more

Mobile Phones and Cultural Differences

global mobile usage

Even though mobile phones are a global phenomenon, there are major cultural differences regarding their use.  This article gives an overview of mobile phone culture in various countries. The public use of a mobile phone, for example, differs greatly per country. Take for example Japan: here, it is considered rude to use your mobile phone in public. People in Spain, however, even answer their phones in business meetings. From “flashing” in Africa to answering your phone in movie theatres in India: read the article for more interesting facts about the cultural implications of mobile phones! Read more

by Elise Kuip

Katia Reed
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