Translation – Kwintessential UK http://www.kwintessential.co.uk A Complete Language Translation Agency Fri, 12 Jan 2018 09:24:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.4 Choosing Your Translation Agency This Year http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/choosing-translation-agency-year/ http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/choosing-translation-agency-year/#respond Fri, 05 Jan 2018 09:37:10 +0000 http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/?p=39213 Happy New Year! We can hardly believe it’s the year 2018 – but what a year 2017 was. Sometimes joyous and

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Happy New Year! We can hardly believe it’s the year 2018 – but what a year 2017 was. Sometimes joyous and sometimes tragic, 2017 was full of surprises. As we look forward to a brand new year, we wonder what surprises are in store – and hope to surprise you with our exceptional translations.

 

If you’re choosing a translation agency for your year ahead, we’ve got a few special attributes that set us apart; but what should you generally look for and avoid when deciding which translation agency to go with?

 

What Makes a Good Translation Agency?

 

Ultimately, the main benefit of using a translation agency is that it saves time. And as the old saying goes – time is money. A good translation agency is one that makes a return on your investment. We’re not just talking about cost though; when you pay a translation agency, you’re paying for their knowledge, customer service levels, turnaround times and the translated works themselves.

 

The cheapest translation agency or freelancer might look good on paper, but what if that initial money saved costs more time down the road? Even if the quality of translation is high, but turnaround times and customer service are poor – you could end up paying a higher price once your time is taken into consideration.

 

A good translation agency is one that returns on your investment. You’ll get good work, on time and on budget.

 

But a great translation agency gives much more. A great agency is trustworthy and effective to the point where you can let them work autonomously on your behalf – from source material and minimal prompting, you’ll get results you’ll be proud to put your name to.

 

A great agency becomes an extension of your team, building your trust, getting to know your needs inside out before a single word is written.

 

What to Look for in a Professional Translation Agency

 

We’ve already established that trustworthiness makes for an amazing translation agency. Look for references and client feedback – they’re good indicators of trustworthiness and can help sort the good from the bad.

 

At Kwintessential, we’re really proud of our amazing client feedback and 4.9 star rating.

 

Make sure the agency can work in your source and target languages – it might seem obvious, but it does get overlooked.

 

First impressions count! Make sure your initial contact is favourable. The best way to know what kind of operation you’re dealing with is to give them a call and talk about your needs. If they listen to your needs, outline a plan of action and make a good offer, chances are you’ve found yourself a good agency.

 

What to Be Cautious of When Choosing a Translation Agency

 

Look out for agencies that don’t have a structured process in place – like a contract or a schedule of work. You need to keep track of what’s being done, by when and how much it will cost. Without a clear record of work, you can only expect the unexpected!

 

Avoid using translation software and agencies that rely on it. Artificial intelligence might be coming on leaps and bounds, but it’s not here yet. Even the most advanced computer translators are unable to make sense of large bodies of text. Machines don’t grasp context, humour, tone of voice, metaphor or symbolism.

 

Generally, they can operate on one word or phrase at a time. Anyone who can remember translating their foreign languages homework one word at a time will also remember how painfully slow (and woefully nonsensical) it ended up being. Human language is one of the hardest things for machines to figure out, and a perfect AI translator may still be decades away.

 

Look out for “spinning” – it’s cheap, but usually extremely low quality text that has been made from similar material and modified slightly to seem original. Such text is almost always an impossible mess to understand, and some agencies will just hope you don’t know the language well enough to notice.

 

At Kwintessential, we don’t take part in any shady shenanigans and we don’t cut any corners. The work we do is trustworthy, accurate and on time – every time!

 

Make Kwintessential Your Translation Agency

 

Looking for a professional translation agency? Contact Kwintessential today. Our experienced interpreters and translators are standing by. Just call (UK +44) 01460 279900 or send your message to us at info@kwintessential.co.uk.

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How to Become a Great Translator or Interpreter http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/become-great-translator-interpreter/ http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/become-great-translator-interpreter/#respond Fri, 15 Dec 2017 09:46:34 +0000 http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/?p=39169   You’d think that translators and interpreters would owe much of their success to good fortune. It’s true that being born

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You’d think that translators and interpreters would owe much of their success to good fortune. It’s true that being born into the right environment or the right family can be all it takes for a great translator to blossom. Being raised in a diverse mix of culture and language can encourage bilingual or even multilingual development – and kick-start a command of language that will last a lifetime.

 

But it’s not exclusively multilingual children that grow up to become translators and interpreters. In fact, most will never even think of becoming translators. People from all walks can discover their love of language at any stage in their life, becoming great translators and interpreters and forging a new career. So how do translators become great at their craft?

 

Become a Great Writer First

 

Translators need to have total control of their own language. The best way to learn the limits and boundaries of any language is to use it creatively, exploring the fringe words and sayings – even making new ones up. Spinning a good yarn is an art, not a science, and honing that artistic skill takes practice.

 

Writing can come naturally to some, but anyone can work on their storytelling by using prompts, reading blogs and guides, and applying writing rules until their own internal voice matures.

 

Creativity is an important part of writing and translating, and it’s a skill that everyone has within them. Even those who claim to be completely uncreative actually are: they just need to unlock it.

 

Always Keep Learning

 

Excellent interpreters and brilliant translators put “learn something new” at the top of their daily tasks. Chances are, you’ll learn something new today without even trying (maybe even by reading this post!). Nobody can truly claim to know it all. Kwintessential is a translation agency with a collection of diverse minds, so all of us find new things, in one way or another, every day.

 

For budding translators, education and academia are brilliant places to start a love affair with language. After school, further education can help you master a foreign language and achieve qualifications that will give you an edge. But qualifications and certifications are just a part of your skillset, and one of the many ways you can grow as a translator. As with so many things in life, real-world experience is the key.

 

Gather Experience

 

Anyone who learned a foreign language at school will remember the difficulty of first picking up the phrases, structures and irregularities in a new language. It comes with time, with practice and with study.

 

There is another way to gain experience in new languages. It’s one of the many ways that people fall in love with translating and interpreting – total immersion in another language. Travel makes this linguistic immersion possible – and as a side effect, has the benefit of enriching your life with amazing experiences.

 

You don’t have to travel to far-flung corners of the earth to immerse yourself in another language. Making friends with someone whose dominant language is the one you’re studying can help both of you develop your skills. It’s not quite as effective, or fun – but it’s certainly closer to home!

 

Love Languages – Especially Your Own

 

The word “passionate” gets thrown around so often, so liberally and so loosely that you’d be forgiven for thinking it means “mildly interested”. Having a true passion for something is almost awkward to explain to others, even to other people with a craft or love for a hobby. They might be able to relate to someone else’s passion – but they’ll never truly understand what the draw is.

 

That immersion and constant fascination with the subject is what separates the great translators and interpreters from the good ones. Language isn’t just a job, it’s their life. It’s what they’d be studying and working with even if they weren’t getting paid for it. The best language to fall in love with is your own. Master as much of it as you can. Explore every corner of it, learn its origins and try to predict its future.

 

Once you find a love for language, you can never let go – translating, interpreting and enjoying the quirks of language will become your own entertainment, and spur your interest for the rest of your life.

 

Translations and Interpreting from Kwintessential

 

For a professional interpreting service and an expert translating service, contact Kwintessential today. Our experienced interpreters and translators are standing by. Just call (UK +44) 01460 279900 or send your message to us at info@kwintessential.co.uk.

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Impossible Translations http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/impossible-translations/ http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/impossible-translations/#respond Fri, 01 Dec 2017 09:39:12 +0000 http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/?p=39140 Language is amazing. We never really stop to think about how amazing it is – maybe because reading, writing and speaking

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Language is amazing. We never really stop to think about how amazing it is – maybe because reading, writing and speaking are instinctive to us. But with language, humankind has found a way to cheat death: to impart knowledge down centuries, millennia and aeons. The true power of language is its timelessness.

 

Language isn’t just an incredible tool that connects minds over the vast expanse of time – it’s amazing for its variety. Each language has evolved in its own way to fit and even shape the culture it’s born in. And in that birth and evolution, words form in such staggering variety and depth of meaning, that direct translations for some become impossible.

 

So, let’s explore that wondrous variety of words with no equivalent – and those poached from other languages to make up for having no native match.

 

Loanwords

 

Often, one language will borrow words from another language – either because there’s no alternative or because it’s had a cultural impact since being introduced. This happens quite frequently in modern languages, such as Japanese, where English words are “Japanised” to feed a growing demand for western cultural phenomena. Japanese, among several other foreign languages, becomes quite poetic when translating the impossible – which we’ll come to in the next section of this post.

 

Farsi, as another example, contains a huge amount of French words that are used in standard, everyday vocabulary – baffling, considering the enormous cultural and geographical chasm between the two languages.

 

Farsi bears grammatical and structural similarity to French and other European languages because they’re actually related, although very distantly. Even still, the vocabulary of modern French words seems quite curious.

 

The answer? In the 19th and 20th centuries, the French language was the de facto language in many consulates, widely spoken by all manner of foreign delegates. French was also the source language of science books and literature circulated in Iranian schools, and many words had no direct equivalent – making the borrowing of words inevitable.

 

Over time, the sporadic, academic use of French became quite a la mode, as it were. As a result, everyday objects and phrases came to be known by their French counterpart words, even if perfectly good Farsi words for them were in use. Fashion in this case, helped dictate the course of a language.

 

Words with No English Equivalent

 

By far, the most interesting area of study for most people are the words that English just can’t replicate. It’s because the results are often poetic, beautiful and romantic in some way – a way that makes you look at things differently. Here are some of the most wonderful words that English cannot match.
Koi no yokan (Japanese) – it means “the feeling upon meeting someone that falling in love with him or her is inevitable”. It’s beautifully romantic, with no direct counterpart.

 

Yūgen (Japanese) – it describes the feeling you get when contemplating the enormity of the universe, itself an indescribable feeling.

 

Schnapsidee (German) – a plan hatched under the influence of alcohol, usually something zany or impossible.

 

Waldeinsamkeit (German) – this word describes the feeling of connection to nature, while alone in the woods.

 

Pena ajena (Spanish) – feeling embarrassed on someone else’s behalf. Quite a universal emotion, with no direct English counterpart.

 

Hygge (Danish) – difficult to pin down, even with a sentence, hygge describes the act of becoming cosy with family and friends, of entering a relaxed but not solitary state of mind. “Cosiness” may be the closest word to it, but is still too broad.

 

English Words with No Direct Translation

 

The English language isn’t free of foibles and irregularities, it does throw out some unique and at times amusing terms; terms like slubberdegullion, kissingcrust and slapdash are rare phrases with no equivalents. Some may have fallen out of vogue, others may only be relevant to bakers and builders, but nevertheless, they have no analogue in any other language.

 

Some languages have no words for some of the most commonly used words in English – like in Polish, where “lunch” is an impossible translation. Traditionally, there’s no midday meal in Polish culture, so there’s no word for lunch.

 

And in most Chinese languages, “dying” has no equivalent. Dead, died and all other forms are present, but the act – the process – has no translation.

 

In Farsi, “windscreen wiper” translates extremely awkwardly, literally becoming “snow wipe-do”.

 

For Expert Translation and Linguistics, Contact Kwintessential

 

For professional translation services, contact Kwintessential today. Our experienced linguists and translators know the deepest meanings of every word – and know just where to apply an “impossible translation”. Just call (UK +44) 01460 279900 or send your message to us at info@kwintessential.co.uk.

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Certified Language Translation: What Does it Mean? http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/what-does-certified-language-translation-mean/ Fri, 27 Oct 2017 08:14:52 +0000 http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/?p=38544   Not all language translation is the same. Depending on the application and intended use of the material being translated, a

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Not all language translation is the same. Depending on the application and intended use of the material being translated, a certified language translation might be the only option. Read on to find out what types of document require certified translation.

 

Different Documents, Different Requirements

 

Certified translation adds a professional element of formality to translations. It gives all parties involved with the document firm assurances that it has been translated by a qualified professional – a member of a recognised body, who holds the proper certificates.

 

The types of documents that usually require certified language translation are basic legal documents – marriage certificates, birth and death certificates – but also things like insurance papers and invoices. The list goes on, but consider any official, non-governmental document to require a certified translator.

 

Government and legal documents need an additional level of assurance – notarised translations provide this extra security. They are carried out in the presence of a notary, under oath and in an official setting.

 

What to Look For in a Certified Translator

 

Before you set about hiring a certified translator, ensure that you’ve identified the type of clearance required for your translated documents – are they government documents, or to be used in a court of law? If so, they’ll need to be notarised, not just certified.

 

All professional translators should be educated to degree level and usually require a postgraduate qualification in translation. Translators with an MA or MSc in translation or translation studies, or a diploma from the Chartered Institute of Linguists are also fully qualified to deliver a trusted translation.

 

Always make sure you ask to see your translator’s credentials before committing to their services.

 

Is it True that UK Translators Don’t Need Qualification or Certification?

 

Actually, yes, it is true – in the UK the translation industry is largely deregulated in comparison to other countries. This gives the UK a varied and thriving freelance sector, where virtually any kind of translator or interpreter can be found. But that doesn’t mean that every translator is equal.

 

You should still look for a fully qualified translator: the downside to such a free market is the risk of poor quality or service.

 

An experienced, organised and talented translator is an absolute must for professional document translation – and if the documents are to be translated internationally, certification and recognised credentials will be required at some stage.

 

It’s best to have all bases covered and to use a qualified translator you can trust –  Kwintessential is dedicated to offering the best possible translations with excellent service. Why not give us a try?

 

Contact Kwintessential

 

For internationally certified, professional translation services, contact Kwintessential today. Our qualified, experienced and dedicated translators are ready to help. Just call (UK +44) 01460 279900 or send your message to us at info@kwintessential.co.uk.

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New Chinese Translation Guidelines http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/new-chinese-translation-guidelines/ Fri, 06 Oct 2017 07:00:15 +0000 http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/?p=38333 We recently delved into the realm of infamous mistranslations and as we discovered, translation bungles haven’t just tickled ribs in the

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We recently delved into the realm of infamous mistranslations and as we discovered, translation bungles haven’t just tickled ribs in the past – they could have instigated the first use of nuclear weapons in war.

 

Today’s mistranslations tend to be on the hilarious side and on the face of it are harmless enough – but Chinese authorities have stepped in to introduce new Chinese translation guidelines in a bid to improve grammar and translations as a whole.

 

China has had enough of the memes

 

No single country has the monopoly on mistranslations, or a general lack of international cultural awareness – but East Asia has garnered a special reputation for poor translations from local tongue into English.

 

This prevalence of poor translation (or rather the frequency with which it’s noticed) is due to the deep economic and historic ties between the region and the English speaking world – ties that draw visitors from all over the planet for business and leisure.

 

Even though bad translations into English first found fame with Japan’s fast and loose use of English, it’s been China that’s found itself the butt of the English speaking world’s jokes. The Chinese government has finally had enough of everyone laughing at menus and signposts.

 

Taking effect in December 2017, English translation in 13 public facing industries will be standardised. The new guidelines for Chinese translation are quite simple and should put an end to the somewhat “poetic” English translations of years gone by. According to the new guidelines, the priorities are proper grammar and keeping language simple: throwing out rare turns of phrase and seldom used words will help remove translation doubts – and put an end to some of the more creatively offensive interpretations made famous on social media.

 

Within these guidelines for simplicity, a general reduction in the use of English is implied; the new rules ask the public sector to avoid overuse of the English language in public places.

 

Why is the Government of China so concerned?

 

When it comes down to it, it’s an image issue. It’s not so much that Chinese officials are feeling particularly sensitive – it’s more how the country as a whole is viewed by the international community.

 

The confusing, often humorous and sometimes offensive translations to English might tickle native English speakers and provide some lowbrow laughs, but the long-term effect on China is actually quite damaging. It paints a portrait of ineptitude, giving the collective nation a bumbling and half-witted appearance. This betrays the economic, academic and cultural brilliance of the country as a whole – and as a country, the image has to be refreshed.

 

It’s for the same reason that professional language translation services exist. Any professional business with multilingual operations wants to ensure that any text associated with them is properly translated for the intended audience. Any harm to the target language is a harm to business.

 

And that’s exactly how China sees it; as the country grows economic ties with the rest of the world, it’s becoming clearer where other nations have the upper hand – and one of the key areas is translation into English. While there’s no risk of China being left behind, repositioning as a confident and competent user of English will help keep the country at the front of the trade queue.

 

Contact Kwintessential for Professional Chinese Translation

 

Would you like to find out more about how Kwintessential translations can work for you and your Chinese translation needs? Get in touch today – we’re happy to advise you and provide a quote. Just fill out a quick contact form, give us a call on 01460 279900 or send an email to info@kwintessential.co.uk.

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Professional Translation for Foreign Language http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/professional-translation-foreign-language/ Fri, 29 Sep 2017 08:00:36 +0000 http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/?p=38241 Language translation in the digital age seems like a straightforward enough affair. The internet holds all the keys to unlock communication

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Language translation in the digital age seems like a straightforward enough affair. The internet holds all the keys to unlock communication with everyone around the world – not just the lines of communication, but the translated words themselves.

 

Unfortunately, not all translations are equal – especially when professional translation is the order of the day. Find out why a professional, certified and (most importantly) human translator is the only option when it comes to document translation.

 

The Importance of Communication

 

Have you ever read that common statistic – the one that says 93% of human communication comes from our body language and tone of voice? These days, it’s disputed as being a myth. Physical communication can’t be replicated in written text, but it’s becoming clearer that delivery is just one piece of the communication puzzle. Spoken, face to face or written – communicating effectively is vitally important to us all, even if we don’t realise it.

 

Let’s take websites for example; website translation is more about knowing the audience and local communities than it is about the core processing of language. Of course, the right information is paramount, but delivering it correctly is equally important. As with all copywriting, you need to engage the intended reader.

 

Language Translation and Localisation

 

Nailing the language in a translation means understanding localisation: common idioms used by the audience, literal translations, turns of phrase, expressive language, sarcasm (or the lack of it), culture and community.

 

Back to the website translation scenario, let’s say we’re translating an international website, with users spanning the North and South American continents, Europe and beyond. We would make more than one set of translations for Spanish users – because Spanish-speakers in Mexico and the USA are a separate local audience, with a distinct set of idioms from the Spanish spoken in Spain.

 

The same goes for French-speaking Canadians, French-speaking Haitians and native French people -he local languages are the same and completely different at the same time!

 

What about closer to home? Well, in Wales, English and Welsh are commonly used in tandem – not just on road signs or in print – but in everyday conversation, woven together. In some communities, Welsh words commonly drop into conversations in English.

 

Kwintessential understands all of this and more, delivering the core message of a website in the best way for an intended audience.

 

The importance of communication can’t be overstated – it’s the bedrock of human society. Getting it right in person is just as important as getting it right in print. Professional language translation can’t be trusted to an automated online translator, no matter how much “artificial intelligence” it’s been built with. Simply copying and pasting text into a browser-based translation service won’t cut it.

 

Nothing beats human intelligence (yet).

 

Legal Document Translation Services

 

In our experience and with our language translation offering, one of the most common needs we see in international business is legal document translation. Translating a legal document can be fraught with risk because of the specificity of the ideas being communicated. A legal document can’t be vague in the least. It can’t just be “good enough”.

 

Making a legal document in multiple languages requires a great deal of care, planning and thought, not only for the laws they apply to but for the language they use. Regardless of language, the document has to deliver the exact same ideas, with no confusion. For complete peace of mind, use a certified translator.

 

What Types of Documents are Translated?

 

Legal documents cover the entire spectrum of the law, from contracts to crime. The most common aspects of law covered by our language translation services are criminal, family, employment, immigration and personal injury law.

 

From administrative subpoenas to work permits – by working closely with legal teams, all applicable documents can be translated into their equivalents.

 

Contact Kwintessential for Professional Language Translation

 

For the right context, the right wording and proper knowledge of the community your words will be delivered to, you need a professional translation service.

 

If you would like to find out more about how Kwintessential translations can work for you, get in touch today. We can advise, guide and provide you with a quote. Please fill out a quick contact form, give us a call on 01460 279900 or email at info@kwintessential.co.uk.

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Infamously Mistranslated Words and Phrases http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/infamously-mistranslated-words-phrases/ Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:15:57 +0000 http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/?p=38226 Translating Services Gone Wrong – Common pitfalls and funny mistranslations   We all know that unless you seek a professional language

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Translating Services Gone Wrong – Common pitfalls and funny mistranslations

 

We all know that unless you seek a professional language translation service, the alternative solution can be unreliable, especially when carried out by free or automated translation apps that are available today, often resulting in funny mistranslations.

 

These applications, unfortunately, fail to take into consideration any ambiguities or local, cultural and contextual considerations. The result is often superficial translations, where misreadings and misinterpretations warp the meaning completely and can lead to huge consequences.

 

For example, in the early 70s, Pepsi introduced a new brand slogan to promote its product: ‘Come alive with the Pepsi Generation’. All fine and A-OK in English, but the problems came to light when Pepsi launched this seemingly safe campaign overseas.

 

Cracks first appeared in Germany where the exact translation of the phrase meant, ‘Rise from the grave with Pepsi!’ In China things got worse, and the strapline used was ‘Pepsi brings your ancestors back from the grave.’

 

Similar errors can be found all over the world: in menus, signage, advertisements, instructions and so on. But, can superficial translations actually change the world?

 

Here at Kwintessential, we know they can:

 

3 Mistranslations that Changed the World

 

New Zealand’s Treaty of Waitangi

 

As British settlement increased in New Zealand over the 18th and 19th centuries, the British Government decided to negotiate a formal agreement with the Māori (native New Zealanders) chiefs to recognise NZ as a British Colony. A treaty was written in English then translated into Māori. The Treaty of Waitangi was signed on February 6, 1840, at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands.

 

However, since its signing, the treaty has caused innumerable problems. This controversy is a result of translation issues. Successive governments, including the 1860s settlers, believe the Treaty gave total sovereignty over the Māori people, their lands and over their resources. But, on the other side, the Māoris believe that the treaty they signed simply allowed the British to use their land, not own it.

 

To help rectify this, the Waitangi Tribunal was set up in 1975 – over a hundred years after the treaty’s creation. This body today rules over many cases and claims that are still being brought forward by dissatisfied Māori descendants who feel they are suffering today because of translation issues rooted in the 19th-century treaty. Many of these claims have stood and compensation has indeed been granted, others that have been denied have resulted in a huge struggle between Māori decedents and settler descendants.

 

While disagreements continue and will do so for a while, The Treaty of Waitangi is still considered New Zealand’s founding document.

 

The Atomic Bomb’s Debut

 

Although it is commonly accepted that the Americans dropped the world’s first atomic bomb to bring an end to the deadly war in Japan, on closer inspection it appears that there may have been a less catastrophic means to the same end:

 

At the time that he was pressed for an answer on the Allies’ demand for a Japanese surrender, Japan’s Premier, Kantara Suzuki, replied “Mokusatsu” – from the Japanese word for silence. I.e. he had given “no comment” as the Japanese government hadn’t yet had a chance to consider the ultimatum.

 

However, the word has other meanings quite different from that intended by Suzuki and it was these that international agencies picked up on. It was reported that the Japanese first in command saw the ultimatum as “not worthy of comment.” I.e. surrender was off the cards. As a result, the bombs went off 10 days later.

 

Released later, according to the US National Security Agency, “whoever it was who decided to translate mokusatsu by the one meaning (even though that is the first definition in the dictionary) and didn’t add a note that the word might also mean nothing stronger than “to withhold comment” did a horrible disservice to the people who read his translation…and who would never know that there was an ambiguous word used.”

 

The Glass – or was it fur? – Slipper

 

If you ask anyone what type of slipper featured in Cinderella, I’m sure you’d be very surprised if anyone gave you an answer that wasn’t glass. However, translation – or mistranslation – may have a big part to play shaping the story of Cinderella.

 

The best-known version of the fairy tale is Charles Perrault’s 1697 version. This is also the first version to make reference to a glass slipper or ‘pantoufle en verre’ as the French author references. This said, there has been much discussion amongst linguists and etymologists as whether a glass slipper was intended:

 

It is believed that, instead, the original text made reference to a ‘pantoufle en vair’ – a squirrel-fur slipper. The mix-up is to have occurred when the piece was translated as a result of the similarities in pronunciation and spelling between vair and verre.

 

Whatever Perrault’s intention, it cannot be denied that one material would indeed make a much more comfortable slipper than the other.

 

The Importance of Localisation in Language Translation

 

Quality language translation does prioritise word-for-word translation methods. Instead, more complex considerations are necessary for successfully contextualising language.

 

A quality translation service provider, like Kwintessential, will adopt a method of localisation. This means the translation will focus on messages as a whole to preserve meaning, rather than a literal lexical translation.

 

Kwintessential’s Language Translation Services

 

As an ISO:17100 accredited translation agency, at Kwintessential, localisation plays a huge part in each of our certified translators’ daily lives. They take pride in ensuring that messages and meanings are translated rather than stand-alone word translations.

 

Our rigorous localisation methods have also been inspected according to international standards to make sure that the language translations that we provide are the best and most reliable that they can be.

 

To find out more about our quality translation services, and to ensure your humorous mistranslations don’t end up on our infamous list, get in touch today on 01460 279900 or email us at info@kwintessential.co.uk.

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Translating Legal Documents: The Process http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/legal-document-translation-services/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 08:51:51 +0000 http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/?p=38205 When is Legal Document Translation Required? Legal document translation is required when official documents issued in one language require use in

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When is Legal Document Translation Required?

Legal document translation is required when official documents issued in one language require use in another. This will call for high-level, certified, legal and official translation services.

 

The most common need for translating foreign documents arises from people requiring overseas use of personal legal documents: for example immigration purposes, family law, birth and death certificates, injury law or even business and employment law.

 

If you think you need professional translation, please get in touch and we can discuss with you your options.

 

The Types of Document Translation Services

 

As already established, legal document translation services may need to be certified, legal and official. Yet, these categories can be further broken down depending on the level of legalisation required.

 

Certified Document Translation

 

Being the least formal option, certified translations are most commonly associated with legal documents required for use by non-government bodies. This type of translation can be carried out and certified for organisations such as schools, universities and insurance providers.

 

Also referred to as official translation, certified services cover the translation of documents such as marriage certificates, academic qualifications, household bills, power of attorney, contracts, official reports and transcripts, e.g. school and medical reports.

 

Sworn Document Translation

 

As the name suggests, a sworn translation calls for the translator to swear an oath in front of a Public Notary. This oath confirms that they did indeed complete the certified translation themselves.

 

Notarised Document Translation

 

Required by more formal government and legal bodies, notarised translation is more complex than certified and sworn translation services. The process of notarisation involves the translator themselves attending a Public Notary and declaring in writing and in oath that their document translation “is a true and honest translation.”

 

Once this is established, the notary will approve the translator’s identity and qualifications before providing the translation with a certified ‘notarised’ stamp.

 

You may need notarised document translation when you are establishing a new company or if you require the use of immigration or emigration application documents.

 

Legalisation or Apostille Document Translation

 

Similar to notarised document translation, legalisation or apostille services will involve the use of an original document alongside its translation.

 

To achieve an apostille certification stamp, the original document and translation itself will need to be processed by the Foreign Office and Commonwealth Office. Here, an additional document will be issued to act as confirmation that the notary was indeed in a position to give a document notarisation in the first place.

 

Although this process can be quite lengthy, this additional document means that “the authenticity of the document should not be contested.”

 

Such a high level of document translation and approval is most commonly required for those papers used internationally in regards to overseas marriage, adoption, visa and job applications.

 

Although we have given examples of when to use the above translations, it is vital that when translating a legal document you check what level or wording, certification and authentication is used when requesting any translation service. If you are in any doubt, get in touch, where one of our team will be able to guide you to your best option.

 

Why is Document Translation so important?

 

With 40% of our clients coming from the legal sector, we know just how important detailed document translation is; the slightest error in language, messaging or format can have serious consequences.

 

A certified translator can offer both businesses and individuals expert translation services to keep your message intact whilst using the correct local terminology and dialect to allow their processing. It is this level of localisation that can make all the difference by allowing for easier, more human communication and contact.

 

Contact Kwintessential

 

As an ISO:17100 accredited translation agency, all Kwintessential work is inspected and cross-checked according to international standards. Alongside this, we also operate our own stringent Quality Management Systems.

 

Our certified translations are used nationwide for legal, business and individual purposes. To find out how our document and language translation services can help you, please contact us today.

 

 

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Cultural Considerations for Language Translation http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/cultural-considerations-language-translation/ Fri, 08 Sep 2017 09:04:46 +0000 http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/?p=38192 The importance of cultural considerations for a company’s reputation   Effective language translation does not solely refer to the lexical word-for-word

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The importance of cultural considerations for a company’s reputation

 

Effective language translation does not solely refer to the lexical word-for-word translation. Instead, cultural considerations have a large role to play in contextualising language translations.

 

What may be acceptable in one country or region can end up being an embarrassing faux-pas or more serious breach of legality in another. For instance, consider the careful nature in which the mention of civil statuses, sexual orientation, contraceptives and religion must be handled. The miscommunication of any of these, for a company in particular, can prove disastrous.

 

Hence, when conducting any language translation it is key to consider all cultures that may come into direct contact with your translated material. Your translation then must be localised and diversified to meet all of these cultural requirements. This is a key step in ensuring that your language translation makes a positive impact.

 

What is Localisation? And how does it affect language translation?

 

Simply put, language localisation is a form of modification that adapts a translation to fit local customs, culture and expectations.

 

As mentioned above, any language translations dealing with religion in particular must be taken through a rigorous localisation process. An obvious example of this is any translation that deals with clothing and women’s clothing in particular.

 

Where women in today’s Western world are free to clad themselves in whatever garments they choose, (save perhaps slight social judgement) in Eastern regions – notably in the UAE – women have very strict rules to follow. Rules that when broken, can result in huge legal implications as opposed to just a jibing comment from a snooty neighbour.

 

As an example, if a company was running a car campaign that focused around spontaneity, the use of the phrase “feel the wind in your hair“ would need localisation. In many Eastern cultures it is necessary for women – and in some religions men too – to have their hair, head and/or face covered. Thus, any language translation that mentions, promotes or even implies the avoidance of adhering to these rules must be modified. In this case, the language translation would need to use an alternative strapline that still communicated the same meaning of opportunity, freedom and satisfaction.

 

Contact Kwintessential

 

At Kwintessential, localisation is part and parcel of every language translation that we undertake. We ensure that transcreation and localisation play a key role in guiding every one of our services. This means that we translate messages and meanings rather than simply lexical considerations.

 

Our rigorous localisation methods mean that messages are not diluted or inappropriate when broadcast globally, instead they are strengthened as they are allowed to strike a chord in each region they land.

 

Although we offer significant services for corporations, at Kwintessential our language translation also covers those smaller groups who are also looking to communicate internationally.

 

To find out more about our professional and accurate language translation services, get in touch today on 01460 279900 or email us at info@kwintessential.co.uk.

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Storytelling and Translation – The Most Popular Novels Worldwide http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/blog/translation/book-translation-storytelling/ Wed, 30 Aug 2017 13:53:04 +0000 http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/?p=37922 When you think of storytelling, you imagine a bedtime story with a parent reading to their child – stories are known

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When you think of storytelling, you imagine a bedtime story with a parent reading to their child – stories are known to help children make sense of the world around them and encourage exploration of the mind. This is where storytelling and translation go hand in hand, as people around the world are enjoying the same stories, translated in their native language.

 

It’s not just about children, however. A great story can impact old and young readers across the globe. Professionals need to understand storytelling, because it is not just words that they are translating, but complex ideas, emotions and stories. Messages from these novels need to be translated effectively in different languages, without losing the original meaning or emotional context.

 

Book Translation

 

With technology and online availability, book translation has taken a big leap in recent years. Translations have made it possible for avid readers from all over the world to get an insight into other writers and their customs, traditions and thoughts for both fiction and non-fiction.

 

The Most Popular Books Translated

 

Stories are engaging, plot twists excite and endings can even make us cry. Whether in the UK or as far as China, a book can bring a multitude of emotions to those across the world and many of our favourite novels and even poems are translated in over 140 different languages. We take a look at some of the most popular translated novels below.

 

 

Little Prince Book Translation

The Little Prince (Le Petit Prince)

 

Originally written in French by Antonie de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince has been translated over 300 times, making it the world’s most translated book – with the exception of religious works.

 

First published in 1943, the story makes philosophical remarks on the strangeness of the adult world. The Little Prince has now sold over 2 million copies in a wide range of languages, with the latest being Hassanya.

 

Hassanya is the language spoken by Moorish tribes living in Cap Juby, where The Little Prince’s author served as an Aéropostale station manager and where he found great inspiration for his works.

 

 

 

 

Alice in Wonderland Book Translation

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

 

Written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is one of the most frequently quoted books in the world after the Bible, Koran and Shakespeare.

 

Almost 150 years after its first publication, it has been translated into over 125 languages and has inspired numerous stage, film and television adaptations across the world.

 

One of the greatest challenges faced by the book’s different translations is conveying Charles Lutwidge Dodgson’s creative English flair with a series of wordplays, alliterations and word-creations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sea Underwater Book Translation

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Vingt mille lieues sous les mers)

 

This classic science fiction novel based on a sea monster was written by Jules Verne, a world-renowned French writer. Jules’ other popular works include Around the World in Eighty Days and Journey to the Center of the Earth.

 

Originally published in 1870, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea has been translated into 147 languages, with their biggest readership in French, Spanish and Chinese.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harry Potter Series

 

Harry Potter Book Translation

As of July 2013, J.K. Rowling’s masterpieces have sold close to 450 million copies and have been translated into 73 languages, making this one of the best-selling series in history.

 

Even despite widespread concerns about its dark connotations and use of difficult language, Harry Potter has left both children and adults alike engaged and craving more.

 

With worldwide translation being available, the seven books created many challenges in translating the original meanings to ensure that audiences felt the same in England as they did in, say, Norway. The biggest issue was with the transmission of the made-up magical words, acronyms, cultural elements, jokes and riddles.

 

It was decided that depending on the word, they would either translate or keep as is. For most words, they would look to replace with native words that convey the same meaning, but names, fictional words and words with Latin origins for example would be kept the same.

 

 

 

 

Paradise Lost Book Translation

Paradise Lost

 

With John Milton’s version being translated more than 300 times and in 57 different languages, Paradise Lost is one of the most translated pieces in the world, years after it was first published.

 

From Urdu and Arabic to Greek and Romanian, from Chinese and Japanese to English and Welsh, the different translations have kept one thing: the feeling and meaning behind the story. This is important for any translation, as even with direct transcription the meaning can become lost.

 

Click here to view all of our languages translation.

 

 

 

 

Translation with Creativity: A Non-fiction Story

 

To ensure that your novel is interpreted in the way intended, it’s important to have the translation completed by a native speaker. At Kwintessential, we specialise in native translations that are correct, accurate and appropriate to different audiences.

 

We are passionate about all things translation – from books and publications, documents to websites, internal to external communications, from French to Arabic and any language in between.

 

Our international translators have the high level of understanding and accuracy needed to provide a robust translation service for our publishing clients. To find out more about our bespoke publishing translation services, get in contact today on 01460 279900 or email us at info@kwintessential.co.uk.

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